Claudia Rankine and autobiography

Hello poets and readers,

In this exploration of poetic process, I’ve been gathering what can be gleaned from existing interviews when the subject of process bubbles up. Jamaican-born US poet Claudia Rankine responds to a question from interviewer Katy Lederer about the differences between her first two collections Nothing in Nature is Private and The End of the Alphabet by saying that, from her point of view, part of the problem with her first book was that, “the subject did not determine the form” (in Henry & Zawacki 2005, 147). This, she says, led to a situation where the point of view of the book started to “typecast itself” into a pre-conceived portrait of blackness and immigration which meant that her own consciousness seemed to become lost (147).

Philip Gross and free-search

Hello poets and readers,

When I come across a great poem that shows originality of form or content, I often wonder how it was made. The process of making a poem is often not fully articulated and in my interviews with poets I will aim to be as specific as possible about the writing process to elucidate how they work. I’m also on the lookout for existing interviews or essays which may tell us something about the writing process. I want to create a resource that other poets may use to invigorate and stimulate their writing and that readers will find illuminating.

Philip Gross and collaboration

Hello poets and readers,

I recently revisited the text of UK poet Philip Gross’ keynote speech ‘Together in the Space Between: Collaboration as a Window on Creative Process’ given at the Poetry on the Move festival in 2015 and later published in Axon. Gross has had the advantage of a number of productive creative collaborations, both with artists from other media and, less commonly, with a fellow writer. Early in his career, he worked in a mixed group of painters and musicians from several traditions gathered around John Eaves’ huge charcoal drawings of Stonehenge, a collaboration which was extended to include the artist FJ Kennedy. The topic of Stonehenge is one shrouded in unknowing, which was deemed inviting to creative adventure, to leaving behind preconceived notions and to improvising.

Alison Whittaker and law

Hello poets and readers,

I came across a fascinating interview with Indigenous poet Alison Whittaker in a recent issue of the Melbourne-based journal Rabbit. Whittaker is both a lawyer and a poet. She believes that poetry and law have much in common, since they both “litigate meaning and try to persuade people,” and both have rules and codes. They differ in their degree of formality, and Whittaker’s progress in both domains has become less about balancing and more about harmonising. This has resulted in the emergence of an intriguing process at work in some of her poetry.

Amy Lowell and the subconscious

Hello poets and readers,

One of the first pieces of writing I remember reading about process is Amy Lowell’s essay ‘The Process of Making Poetry’ (from a book originally published in 1930). Lowell was an early shaker in the Imagist movement, and experimented with lineation and what we now call prose poetry. She also wrote haiku and is anthologised in the recent Haiku in English: The First Hundred Years.

Found text manipulation by Melinda Smith

Hello poets and readers. Have you listened to the podcast with Melinda Smith yet? Don’t forget we’d love to hear any comments about what resonated with you. Today Poetry in Process is excited to bring you one of the found text poems Melinda referred to in the interview, about Ernie Ecob. Hope you enjoy it!

Ernie Ecob . . . was arguing against providing bathroom facilities in shearing sheds for female shearers because he said women only want to be shearers for the sex. My mind melted at the number of levels on which that was the weird and wrong thing to say. Melinda Smith

Poetry in Process Podcast, 28th February 2019

Ernie Ecob as a Bare-Bellied Yoe

Podcast: Melinda Smith’s process

Australian poet Melinda Smith discusses her writing process
in an interview with Owen Bullock.

Melinda Smith makes a lot of art. She is a poet willing to experiment, and, invariably, the experiments pay off. Whether with form, or seeking out incisive and vital new content, her work interrogates language and society. It’s reaped the rewards of recognition in the form of the Australian Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Poetry and in being viewed as a poet who balances openness and play with a concern for social justice.

We have a society . . . in which artists are free to do and say mostly what they like without being . . . thrown into jail for it, and we should celebrate that fact and use it to aspire to be a society in which there is a lot of art for everyone.

Melinda Smith

Poetry in Process Podcast, 28th February 2019

Welcome poets and readers

See what we have in store for you in the coming months. Sign up for emails to hear interviews that delve deeply into the mystery of poetry making by some of Australia’s most innovative poets

Hello, poets and readers, I’m Owen Bullock, welcome to the Poetry in Process podcast.

Have you ever wanted to be a better poet? More original, more moving, more incisive? I have.

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